Scholar: Vol. 1, No. 1 (2009)

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    DEVELOPMENT OF A CAREER COUNSELING CENTER MODEL FOR PREPARING STUDENTS FOR THE WORLD OF WORK USING ENNEAGRAM PERSONALITY THEORY
    The objectives of this study were: (1) to investigate career counseling provision and its pattern. (2) To develop a model of career counseling center for preparing students into the world of work by using Enneagram personality theory to observe the evaluation process of Thai students’ characteristics. (3) To formulate the model of career counseling for students in Thai higher education institutes by integrating Thai value and Enneagram personality theory in order to establish research personality measures for individual student. Samples are four-year-university students from the universities that provided all nine educational groups categorized by UNESCO entitled International Standard Classification of Education (ISCED). Comprehensive universities selected for the study were Chulalongkorn University, Mahidol University, Kasetsart University, Naresuan University, Chiang Mai University, Khon Kaen University, and Prince of Songkla University. 527 respondents participated in the survey. Multivariate tools from SPSS for Windows were used for statistical analysis. The model of career counseling center was developed and confirmed by a committee of experts using the connoisseurship model. Four out of nine personality types -Epicure, Mediator, Trooper, and Giver- from Enneagram personality theory are mostly found among Thai students. The model of career counseling center was thus developed in accordance with the demands of current student personality as well as objectives in accordance to the university service provision policy under the operation of student affairs division. The preparations of location, facility, and structural design of management, service provision process, and student counseling procedure were developed in accordance to help support the student readiness in entering into the world of work. The recommendation for successful career counseling center was restricted its scope of work in programs of study and career counseling. Special emphasis was to be placed upon student personality types in tailored made counseling program oriented to future careers, following six procedures of one-stop counseling service: to investigate student personality type, test of student personality type, check the vacancy job position on database, study on the characteristic of the perspective job, attend the training program, and apply to the job. The counseling service should be based on each student personality type that influences his / her future profession and follow the six procedures of one-stop counseling service.
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    A study on the quality of play towards student development in the international schools of Thailand
    Play is believed to provide benefits for cognitive, social, emotional, physical and moral development for children from all socioeconomic, cultural and linguistic backgrounds. As children spent most of their time these days at school, schools should provide quality play especially to the early year’s programs. Play would facilitate the development of the whole child if it is of quality.Schools can provide quality play for children if they consider the ten dimensions of play in order to evaluate the quality of play at schools. Aims and objectives, curriculum, learning and teaching strategies, planning, assessment and record keeping, staffing, physical environment, relationships and interactions, equal opportunities, parental partnerships and liaison, monitoring and evaluation are the factors that affect the quality of play at schools. The other essential element to produce quality play is teacher facilitation and understanding towards play.Many theorists like Piaget, Vygotsky, Bruner, Erikson and others have supported the importance of play for children to develop. Thus, the question is not about the presence of play at schools but the quality of play that has been provided by the school is essential. Since, play is common for children, especially in early years, schools already have an essential tool for the development of children but schools need to evaluate and be aware of the quality of play in the schools.Piaget stated the pre – operational stage related to the child’s development. At this stage students can apply the theory of assimilation and accommodation. While the child is at classroom experiencing an academic experience, the child is experiencing assimilation but when children are at play they get a chance to accommodate what they have learnt through play. Play has been regarded as an important element to children’s lives. In the olden days when children spent more time in the fields and homes rather than schools like now, they had the opportunity to interact with their family member, friends, relatives and neighbors. We would often see them playing different kinds of group games together. But these days children are sent to the schools at an early age assuming that they would be better off with an early foundation on the academic areas of life in order to be successful individuals in the future. We could see wonderful playgrounds around the schools with no children playing in it. It is essential for schools to provide the opportunity of play since the school is the greatest area where children could learn and meet friends, in other words school is a social arena where they should be learning and growing. There is a well-established consensus among early childhood professionals that play is an essential element of developmentally appropriate high quality early education programs (Alliance for Childhood, 2006; NAEYC&NAECSSDE,2003). When Children Play: • They have many opportunities to apply mental representations of the world to new objects, people, and situations – the key ability for future academic learning. • They integrate all types of learning – physical, social, emotional, intellectual, and language development. • They are engaged in things they’re interested in – so they have a natural motivation to learn ( Shonkoff & Phillips, 2000) A lot of research has been done in the favor of play for young children. It is regarded as chances for the children to apply their skills, learning and ideas in a situation where they don’t have to think about the consequences of it in reality. There is a well-established consensus among early childhood professionals that play is an essential element of developmentally appropriate high quality early education programs (Alliance for Childhood, 2006; NAEYC&NAECSSDE, 2003). Play provides benefits for cognitive, social, emotional, physical, and moral development (American Academy of Pediatrics, 2006; Elkind, 2007) for children from all socio-economic, cultural, and linguistic backgrounds (Zigler, E. & Bishop-Josef, S., 2006).
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    The study of teacher competence of teachers at schools in the Three Southern Provinces of Thailand
    The research study aimed to determine the teacher competence level and investigate the relationship between teacher qualification, teaching experience, and school size and teacher competence of teachers at schools in the three southern border provinces of Thailand. The method of survey research was used through questionnaire. The unit of analysis was teachers, 750 were selected by simple random sampling methods from nine educational regions, 18 secondary schools, under the Basic Education Commission of Thailand (OBEC) at Narathiwas, Pattani, and Yala province. The instrument used for collecting data was a questionnaire, constructed by the researcher, employing the professional standards of knowledge and experience from the Teacher Council of Thailand (2005) containing nine competence areas. The Cronbach's Alpha coefficient for the reliability was 0.96. The questionnaire consisted of two parts; part one cover up independent variables, part two was 5- rating scale questionnaire pertaining to teacher competence. The statistical devices used in analyzing data were descriptive statistics ; percentage , arithmetic mean, standard deviation to determine the teacher competence level and employed the Pearson 's Product Moment Correlations Coefficient to investigate the relationship between teacher qualification , teaching experience, and school size and teacher competence. The findings revealed three features that most of (l) the teachers (92.88%) hold bachelor degree; very few teachers (6.23%) bold master degree or higher degree. Most of the teachers (71.07%) had teaching experience of more than 10 years. (2) The level of teacher competence of teachers at schools in the three southern border provinces of Thailand was at high level. 'Teachership' was the highest teacher competence. In order from the highest to the lowest of nine competence areas, the ranking was teachership ; psychology for teachers; educational measurement and evaluation; classroom management ; learning m anagement; educational innovation and information technology , language and technology for teachers; curriculum development; and educational research. 3) An analysis of the relationship between teacher qualification, teaching experience,and school size and teacher competence of teachers was conducted. This was carried out in the three southern border provinces of Thailand by using Pearson Product Moment Correlation Coefficients. The results revealed that: (a )There was a positive, significant relationship, between teacher qualification and teaching experience, teacher competence areas in language and technology for teachers, curriculum development, and educational research.(b) There was positive, significant relationship, between teaching experience and school size, teacher competence areas of curriculum development: This was a negative significant relation sh ip with competence areas in language and technology for teachers and educational innovation and information technology.The results of the findings provide several direction s for future research and practice. The results confirm the value of professional teacher standards of knowledge and experience for teachers and educators and its relations in the context of the schools in the three southern border provinces of Thailand.
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    A model for developing student leaders through student activities
    The objectives of this study were: 1) To identify characteristics of student leaders; 2) To ascertain a taxonomy of student leader characteristics; 3) To propose a model for developing new student leaders through student activities. The research methodology was divided into 5 steps according to the objectives. The first procedure in the research design was to identify characteristics of the leader, so the researcher reviewed materials from various sources such as leadership documents, textbooks, websites, research, journals. In addition, the researcher used content analysis methods to synthesize leadership characteristics that existed in leadership theories and found out core characteristics of leaders as presented in dendrograms. The second procedure in the research design was to ascertain a taxonomy of student leader characteristics. The researcher used the core leader characteristics to create the Student Leader Characteristics Checklist and test validity through input from experts combined with using a pilot study of 30 university students at ABAC for a reliability test. Next, a survey of student leaders at universities in Thailand was conducted. The result was the development of Grounded theory of Thai University Student Leader Characteristics. The third procedure in the research design was to find the gaps between student leader characteristics and general leader characteristics. That meant the researcher had to compare the characteristics of student leaders and what ideal characteristics of the leader could potentially be. These were tabulated and grouped by frequency count. The fourth procedure in the research design proposed a model for developing new student leaders through student activities. After determining the missing characteristics of the student leaders, these were matched to student leader characteristics using student activities. If none of the activities enhanced missing characteristics, they were recommending for the new activities. The fifth procedure in the research design was to test the proposed model using expert review. The researcher used the connoisseurship model technique to evaluate the model by the judgment of experts toward the proposed model. Finally, after running through these procedures, a model was developed for new student leaders through student activities. The major findings were as follows : 1) the characteristics of the leader are divided into four dimensions : Intellectual Dimension, Social Dimension, Style Dimension and Management Dimension. 2) The student leader characteristics were in four dimensions but the most non-evident characteristics were Creativity and Critical thinking, Emotional intelligence, Vision and Work in team. 3) A proposed model for developing student leader characteristics through the student activities program in order to enhance the characteristics of the student leaders that reflected on 4 dimensions of the leader characteristics.