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dc.contributor.authorArunee Charaschanya
dc.contributor.authorBlauw, Jon
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-21T06:38:42Z
dc.date.available2018-02-21T06:38:42Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationScholar: Human Sciences 9, 2 (July-December 2017), 275-301en_US
dc.identifier.issn2586-9388
dc.identifier.urihttp://repository.au.edu/handle/6623004553/20373
dc.description.abstractThis study attempted to investigate the direct and indirect influences of online disinhibition effect on university students’ levels of depression and stress, being mediated by their reported frequency of cyberbullying as victim and perpetrator. A total of 217 students completed a survey questionnaire consisting of a demographics section, the Online Disinhibition Scale (Udris, 2014) to measure benign online disinhibition and toxic online disinhibition, the Cyberbullying Scale (Patchin & Hinduja, 2010) to measure cyberbullying as victim and perpetrator, and the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (Lovibond & Lovibond, 1995) to measure depression and stress levels. Results revealed that the participants’ reported mean score of benign online disinhibition (i.e., helpful and prosocial behaviors) was higher than that of toxic online disinhibition (i.e., hurtful and denigrating behaviors). Results of path analysis showed that the participants’ reported level of toxic online disinhibition has both direct and indirect influences on their reported levels of depression and stress. In terms of direct influence, it was found that the higher the participants’ reported level of toxic online disinhibition, the higher their reported levels of depression and stress. The results also showed that in terms of indirect influence, the higher the participants’ reported level of toxic online disinhibition, the more they reported themselves as being victims of cyberbullying and, subsequently, the higher their reported levels of depression and stress. The participants’ reported level of benign online disinhibition was not found to be significantly associated with their reported levels of depression and stress, either directly or indirectly.en_US
dc.format.extent27 pagesen_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherDigital Production Press, Assumption Universityen_US
dc.rightsThis work is protected by copyright. Reproduction or distribution of the work in any format is prohibited without written permission of the copyright owner.en_US
dc.subjectOnline disinhibition effecten_US
dc.subjectBenign online disinhibitionen_US
dc.subjectToxic online disinhibitionen_US
dc.subjectCyberbullyingen_US
dc.subjectCyberbullying victimen_US
dc.subjectCyberbullying perpetratoren_US
dc.subjectDepressionen_US
dc.subjectStressen_US
dc.subject.otherScholar: -- Human Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.otherScholar: -- Human Sciences -- 2017en_US
dc.titleA STUDY OF THE DIRECT AND INDIRECT RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN ONLINE DISINHIBITION AND DEPRESSION AND STRESS BEING MEDIATED BY THE FREQUENCY OF CYBERBULLYING FROM VICTIM AND PERPETRATOR PERSPECTIVESen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.rights.holderAssumption Universityen_US
mods.genreJournal Articleen_US
au.link.externalLink[Full Text] (http://www.assumptionjournal.au.edu/index.php/Scholar/article/view/3003/1926)


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